Friday, 5 March 2021

Local Names And Families

 It was a nicer day with the weather yesterday although still very grey and quite cold. Scarlett and I went for our usual walk, incorporating the baker's shop on the way back. As we were walking up one road she said "Ooh this is a big hill!". I said to her that about a hundred and fifty years ago someone else was walking up this hill and said exactly the same thing so that is why it is called Hill Road. She was so fascinated by this fact we spent an hours walk trying to work out what someone said 150 years ago to give the road it's name! It was a lot of fun as we couldn't work out some at all but it really got me thinking. I have always been interested in why towns and villages are called what they are and often look up a place to see why, but roads can really tell us a lot about are the area we live. Most of the names of the roads around us are after the farm that used to be on the land and I'm going to look up some others I'm not sure about. Often the road is named after an old house that is sadly long gone or even the people who lived there. I have a really large collection of old photos of our area and this very simple one is one of my favourites.


It is of a young woman called Viola Bawtree  standing at the gate of their family house that was called Clapham Lodge. The road which is the end of the road we live in is little more than a farm track when this photo was taken. Today it is lined with 1930s houses and where Viola is standing is the entrance to a 1970s close called Bawtree Close. Clapham Lodge the family home still stand at the end of the close. I wonder how many people who live in the area know anything about the family who used to live there. Yesterday's conversation with Scarlett has made me definitely want to find out more about the names of the roads. She is such a bright little girl always questioning everything and I know she will love it if I can tell her some more about the names of the roads locally.

When we arrived back from our walk a parcel had arrived with a few more bits for the dolls house so we spent the afternoon setting it all up. It was lovely to spend such a happy, carefree day after all the hard work of the previous two. 


Poor Tom is back at work on a seven day stretch though. He got a letter yesterday saying he could book his coronavirus vaccine but when I went online to book it, although it would let me book the first one locally it said I had to book the second one at the same time and there were no available slots locally, the closest was Streatham which is really hard to get to. I'll just have to keep checking or hope our GP's surgery may contact him soon.

It's a lovely bright morning today and I am off to do my Dad's shopping so I'm glad it looks like there won't be any rain. I hope everyone has a lovely day what ever you are doing. xx

10 comments:

  1. Just passing..
    I do know that roads located in terrain
    having a cross slope of 25% or more is
    considered as a hill road...

    I to find names of places, towns, roads
    etc..most interesting..! :).

    And, yes, it's a lovely bright day over
    here in Dorset..
    I discovered a new oven cleaner last week,
    on line, and sold in the Pound (£1) Shop..
    Though on line it's a pound..P&P £4:95...
    Found it on eBay for £3:99 free P&P...
    It arrived the day after, and l did my small
    oven, 'amazing'..it really is..
    So l've just spent two hours doing my range
    cooker..it's a miracle..it really is, so l've
    sent details to family and friends..use it!
    use it!
    Oh! Nearly forgot it's called...'The Pink Stuff'..

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    1. Hi Willie and thank you for passing through :) I didn't know that. My oven could definitely do with a clean as I waste too much time in the garden! So thank you the recommendation I may try it.

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  2. I grew up in Lancashire and we would walk up the brew which was the name for the nearby steep road. I've never heard the word used here in Wales. Ooh, I am envious of your doll's house.

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    Replies
    1. My family all originally come from Lancashire I must ask them. It's funny how different areas use different words isn't it. It fascinates me!

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  3. This area had a sports centre and dry ski slope on it before they demolished it to build this estate. My home was built 10 years ago and is named after the man who managed the sports centre. It is a very common Norwegian name but as we are in Britain, everybody asks me to spell it. I love place names and have researched lots in this town. it is so interesting.

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    1. Where we used to live was named after French farmer who used to own the land and we always had to spell it too! It's nice the man who managed the sports centre has been remembered. He must have been very well regarded.

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  4. I always enjoy learning the history of places and street/town names too.
    Good luck on finding a vaccine. I finally got an appointment last night and it's for Monday! Yippee!
    Blessings,
    Betsy

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    Replies
    1. I am a bit history obsessed too Betsy! Tom has decided he better travel a bit to get his vaccine rather than wait now. Good news you are getting yours.

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  5. It really is fascinating how roads and streets ( or towns) get their names. Our street is named after the farmer who owned this whole large area once upon a time. Apparently where our house stands was the actual farm yard and that's one reason we have such gravelly sandy soil. Not rich soil that you'd find on a field.

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    Replies
    1. Ours was built on where the farm buildings situated but it has certainly led to some interesting finds. I think it's wonderful when people's names live on in a road.

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